SDA-WA Member Activities – Updates For March 2016

Member Activities (and a few other reminders)

Hi SDA-WA!

Our members are a busy bunch!  Just a reminder – if you would like your activities and events posted on our blog or Facebook page, please send an email to blog.surfacedesignwa@gmail.com with your event or activity information, your contact info, and a good photo or two or three of your event, activity, art, or yourself!

Gay Jensen and Dorothy McGuinness

dorothy at the schack

Dorothy McGuinness

 

Gay and Dorothy both have pieces in the 20th Juried Art Exhibit at the Schack. For more information, see:

JURIED ART EXHIBIT

March 10 – April 23, 2016

Opening Reception: Thursday, March 10, 5-8pm
Awards Presentation at 6:30pm

gay at the schack

Gay Jensen

Sponsored by the City of Everett Cultural Arts Commission

This biennial collection of Northwest artists features a wide variety of mediums to produce an eclectic and visually stimulating exhibit. Jurors: James Arrabito, Chris Hopkins, and Verena Schwippert.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nan Leaman & the Whidbey Island Surface Design Group

nan leaman

Nan Leaman

Nan and WISD are showing some of their works at the La Connor Quilt Museum in the show Beyond The Surface.   Beyond the Surface includes artwork using fiber and fabric as the basis for the work. Each artist has their own unique style and the process used to accomplish their work is as varied as the individual piece. Techniques include:  dyeing, wrapping, felting, stitching, weaving, image transfer, beading, quilting, painting, printing, and collage.

For more information, see: http://www.laconnerquilts.org/beyond-the-surface.html

Nan also has works on display at:

  • The Santa Fe Weaving Gallery, Santa Fe NM
  • The Flying Shuttle, Seattle WA
  • Artworks Gallery, Whidbey Island, WA

 

Diane Williams

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Diane Williams

Diane is an artist participating in the Real Change Portrait Project.  Her work (along with many others) will be on display at Seattle City Hall from March 1st through the end of April 2016.  The opening reception is March 1st,  from 2-4pm.   Since the project began about four years ago, more than 30 artists have volunteered to paint a portrait of a Real Change vendor.

“I made a portrait quilt for the Real Change Portrait Project. It features 30 Real Change vendors on a city street like grid surrounded by crazy quilt scraps  All seams are exposed and the binding is wonky because homelessness is not neat and finished. The quilting goes every which way because homelessness is crazy and unpredictable. It was featured on the cover of Real Change during the Winter Fund Drive in 2013.”

Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry

caryl bryer fallert gentry

Caryl Bryer Fallert-Gentry

Caryl says “I’m very pleased to announce that I will be escorting a quilters safari to Kenya in January of 2017.  Please join me to see the fabrics and fiber arts of Africa as well as the amazing wildlife and culture in this beautiful country.  This is a deluxe tour with professional guides, great accommodations, and only four people per Land Rover on the game spotting runs.

There will even be a couple of afternoons when we can fit in a quilting presentation or two.  You can find all of the details and book online at Craft Tours http://www.crafttours.com/trips/?page=africa_caryl_0117

Here is your brochure:
http://www.bryerpatch.com/news/Kenya2017/Kenya2017.pdf

Here are details of the itinerary:
http://www.bryerpatch.com/news/Kenya2017/KenyaItinerary.pdf

I hope you can join me.

Caryl

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Fiber-Fusion-Logo-Web-400x484

 

 

And yes, it’s another reminder for all of our members!

The Fiber Fusion Traveling Art Show call-for-art closes on March 20th.  That’s only 3 weeks away!   Don’t let this great opportunity pass you by!

Click here to access the entry form: http://sdafiberfusionshow.org/fiber-fusion-entry-form/

 

 

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Are you a SDA Member and would like to see your news posted here?

If so, please send us an email by the 15th of each month to: blog.surfacedesignwa@gmail.com

Please include:

  • Your name and contact info
  • your event or activity (please include the location, dates, and the times of your events!)
  • The website for your event if your event has one
  • A picture that you want included (or two or three – we may not use them all, but it’s nice to have options!)   **NOTE – it is wonderful to have a picture of your artwork and a picture of you as well!
  • A breif write-up/description of the event and/or artwork

_______________________________________________________________

Just a quick reminder about a great opportunity for quilters to attend a Quilt Art Symposium occuring in Tacoma, WA in April!

quiltartsymposiumA Gathering of Art Quilters

Quilt Art Symposium promises to shine a light on the future of Quilt Art with three leading speakers, a luncheon, an artist-led tour of the CQA exhibit, and an opening party.

Saturday, April 16, 2016
Washington State History Museum
Tacoma WA

Tickets are $75 +available here

Please help CQA by spreading the word about this quilt community event.

http://quiltartsym.com/

 

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Reminder – Fiber Fusion’s Call For Art Ends on March 20th, 2016!

The Fiber Fusion Call for Entry deadline 
is 3 weeks away– March 20th.
Our wish is that we will have a full breadth of surface design artwork to show the public and that as many Washington State SDA members participate as possible. Let’s show the art world the innovation and creativity that is possible!
What is Surface Design
Does your artwork qualify as surface design? The question is still being raised. To me, this definition encapsulates it all, especially the last sentence:
Surface design refers to any process that gives structure, pattern, or color to fiber. Fibers used could include handmade felt, paper, fabric, or basket-making materials. Textile here is defined as any natural or artificial fiber or a non-textile element, such as metal, that takes on the properties of fiber or is used in combination with textiles. To these surface designers dye,paint, print, stitch,and otherwise embellish. More than the methods, surface designers are interested in the unlimited options for enhancing and experimenting with color, texture, and design.

Entering A Show – Good Photography Gets Your Work Selected

Shop Talk: Good Photography Gets Your Work Selected

by LM Wood       (Originally Published in SDA Newsblog 03/20/2015)

 

Camera Setting

Camera Settings

Poorly lit photographs in unprofessional settings can kill your chances of getting your work selected for a show. Do you know how to set up your art, lights and camera to produce the most effective photographs? LM Wood produces an illustrated list of dos & don’ts to make sure your entries get seen.

Read the full blog article here: http://www.surfacedesign.org/newsblog/shop-talk-good-photography-gets-your-work-selected

 

lm-wood-from-SDA-website

LM Wood

LM Wood is an experimental artist living and working in North Carolina – as well as SDA Website Manager. Originally from Minnesota, she pursued a variety of careers before discovering art in college.  She received an MFA in Photography fromUniversity of Cincinnati and an MFA in Fibers from Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, IL. Having been educated in a variety of diverse artistic styles and practices, Wood navigates between the domains of art, craft and technology. Her work is a blend of digital technologies and traditional processes, resulting in hybrid works that elevate process and craft to “high art”.

Entering A Show – Preparing For A Juried Show

Pictures For An Exhibition,

by guest blogger Larkin Van Horn

LJVH_blue_headshot_7502

Larkin Van Horn

Jurying artwork for an exhibition holds no great mysteries.  A group of relative strangers sits in a darkened room while images flash before their eyes, from which they must somehow agree which to accept and which to decline.  Easy, right?  Not so fast.

Before they get to that point, they will receive instructions from the
organizer of the show.  These instructions can be as simple as “pick the best work” or “put together something cohesive”, or they can go on for pages.  Usually it is something in between.  The organizer will tell them
things like:  how many pieces to accept; how many linear feet to fill;
whether to focus on visual impact or technical proficiency; how picky to be
about any size restrictions; how closely the work should hold to the theme
of the show (if any); whether to accept controversial pieces (politics,
religion, nudity, etc.) and so on.  If the show is going to travel, the
jurors may be asked to select a sub-set for the smallest venue, or this step
may be left to the organizer.

Though some exhibits are juried from the actual artwork, most exhibits are
juried from photograhs.  And for every slot on the “accepted”
roster, there may be 10 entries or 100.  The jurors have to look at all
these photos and make their choices in one day.  They will start with a fast
run-through of all the entries, making no decisions.  The second time
through, each juror will make notes and vote “Yes”, “No”, or “Maybe”.  Those
entries with all “No” votes will be set aside.  Those with all “Yes” votes
will be accepted.  If all the stars align, the number of “Yes” votes will
equal the number of slots on the roster, and everyone can go home.  Not very
likely. The next step is to scrutinize the “Maybe” pieces to see which make
the most sense to move up to fill the roster.  There is a lot of discussion
at this point.  And then the final run-through of the accepted works.  The
jurors will be asking themselves things like “will this collection make a
cohesive show?”, “will this collection engage the viewers?”, “is this
representative of the organization?”.

To add furtmonkey covering eyes cliparther confusion to the mix, most juries are “blind”, meaning the photos are not accompanied by the name of the artist. So the jurors have no way of knowing if they have included something from everyone who entered, or if they have put together a 6 person show.  If the instructions to the jury included the requirement that every person who enters the show will have one piece in the show, then right before the final run-through one of the assistants will check the selected entries against the list of accepted pieces to make sure that hurdle has been crossed.  If not, it’s back to the
drawing board for the jurors.

Jurors come to their task with their backgrounds as artists, gallery owners,
museum curators, collectors, etc.  As much as they try to stay completely
objective, they are, after all, human.  Their personal tastes and
preferences come with them and will undoubtedly color some of their
decisions.  Accept this, forgive them, and carry on.
camera
One final note:  If the mantra of the real estate business is “location,
location, location”, the mantra of the juried exhibition is “photography, photography, photography”!  If they can’t tell what they are looking at, jurors will vote “No” and move on. Professional product photography can be expensive, and if you plan to do your own photography, remember a few things:
– No fingers and toes.  If your work is intended for the wall, hang it
up.  Don’t hold it up in the driveway.
– Don’t distract the jurors with houseplants, tablecloths, or anything
that is not THE ART.  If your piece requires a stand or support, make sure it is                            unobtrusive.
– FOCUS!  Make sure your photo is not out of focus.  Jurors won’t take
a chance on something they can’t see clearly.
– Get a second opinion.  You know what your art looks like, and may not
see any photographic flaws.  Have someone else look at your photos before                               submitting them.

And a last word about words:  the jurors may ask about the title of your
work, and even your artist statement.  Whatever you write, be clear,
concise, and let the words enhance the experience of seeing the art.
Don’t get lost in artspeak – say what you mean.

There will be future blog posts about preparing your photos for the entry
process and writing an artist statement.  Be on the look out for them, and
remember that the work isn’t done until the paperwork is finished.
And good luck!

Biography–
“Larkin is a member of the Northwest Designer Craftsmen, Studio Art Quilt
Associates, Surface Design Association, and serves on the Board of Directors
for The Grünewald Guild. She is in demand as a teacher and lecturer, and has
published books on beadwork, and patterns for wearable art garments and
fabric vessels. Her work has been displayed and won honors both regionally
and nationally, and is in many private and church collections.   She is an experienced Curator, Juror and Judge for fiber art exhibitions locally and for traveling exhibits.

Larkin grew up in Everett, and currently lives on Whidbey Island in
Washington State with her husband/photographer/webmaster, Van, and her
eclectic collection of fabric, fibers, and beads.”

To learn more about Larkin or her art, please see her website: www.larkinart.com

 

One-Fine-Spring-Day_tn

One Fine Spring Day

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gloria_tn

Gloria

 

Entering A Show – Step One, Create Your Art Inventory.

Fiber-Fusion-Logo-Web-400x484Entering A Show – Step One, Create Your Art Inventory             Written by Barb Matthews

With the opening call for our Fiber Fusion Show in mind, we thought it might be helpful to review the various steps needed to create a successful application for any open call from shows or galleries.

We will be posting a series of steps designed to prepare you for applying to shows and galleries etc.  If you’re new to this process, these steps should provide you with some basic tools to help you stay organized and produce quality entries.  If you’re already participating in shows, these steps are a great reminder for you as well.  As artists, focusing on our art is always our desire, but in reality, a good amount of business needs to be conducted if we want to become successful!penandpaper

Before you even decide to enter your art into a show and complete a call for entry form, it is a good idea to create an inventory of the art you want to enter. The inventory will serve for insurance purposes and will be your record of when you finished your art, where your art was shown, the price, the materials, artist statement, and what has sold. Plus, having the inventory will make completing the entry form much easier.

Camera to computerMost shows will require you to name your photos with your name, usually last name, then either your first name or initial, the title of the art, and whether this is a full or detailed image, for example: Matthews_Barbara_Happier Days_Full.jpg.  Using that naming convention for all your photos makes the entry process that much easier.   If you organize your photos under one folder, you can easily find them when it’s time to complete the entry form. *More on preparing photographs of your art will come in a later post.

Below are some recommended fields of information that you could have in your inventory (Please note that not all of this information will be required by a gallery or show, but it important to track for business purposes!):

Inventory of Art, Definition of Fields

Field Description
Title of Piece The name of the piece as you would like it to appear on the label and in a portfolio.
Date art finished Month and year the piece was completed. If you are like me, this date is a few dates before the first show date.
Width in inches (whole numbers) Width in whole inches.
Height in inches Height in whole inches.
Depth in inches If the piece has a three dimensionality to it, then enter the depth in whole inches. In cases where a piece is not in standard rectangle shape, enter the maximum of the width, height, and depth.
Materials and Techniques Usually there is space on the label for one or two lines for the materials.   You will save yourself some editing later, if you stick to less than 120 characters (including spaces) for this field. The main idea is to include enough, so that the viewer has an idea of the process.   For example, ‘Hand-dyed silk using the Shibori method, wax resist, and machine stitching’. Please note, if you use a product that was made by someone else, you should note that, for example ‘Purchased hand-dyed silk…’ This prevents misrepresentation of your art to the juror and public.
Statement about the art (maximum 500 char) Here you talk about the inspiration for your art and hopefully draw the juror and viewer into the moment(s) when the art was created.   Colorful, descriptive adjectives and active tense make the description more interesting. To help, think of asking yourself the following questions:

1. What inspired you to make this piece?

2. What does the piece mean to you?

3. What is unique or special about the way you make it?

Speak from the heart and after the first draft, eliminate the lofty language that doesn’t add to the description and will only serve to turn the viewer off.

Insurance value If you keep good records of the materials and supplies used, you will have an easier time developing a value for insurance purposes. Unless you have a track record of sales on similar art, a claims adjuster will want this documentation of costs. The insurance value is not the price you place on a piece or the amount you receive after the commission is deducted. The insurance value will not change over time, but the price may.
Where art has shown  It’s a good idea to keep a list of all the places a piece of art has shown.  Many galleries or shows have rules about artwork having previously shown at locations close to them.
First venue where art was shown Keep track of where your art has shown, this will prevent showing in the same area/gallery in the future. This official name also is your reference in the future—was it Northern Lights Arts, Northern Light Art Center?
Dates shown The start and end dates of the show.
Price at that venue Price listed at this venue. This does not suggest that the price of the piece should change from venue to venue. Goodwill with the customer will not be preserved if a customer bought a piece at a higher price just weeks before seeing a similar piece in another venue at a lower price. However, that said, you may want to move your art and lower the price if there is adequate time between shows.
Second venue where art was shown Repeat these above four rows for the second, third and subsequent places the art was shown.
Images of piece Names and file locations
Full image Show requirements for title of image files are typically Last Name, First Name, Title of Piece, and whether an image of the ‘Full’ art or ‘Detail’ image.   These could be separated by underlines, for example—Matthews_Barbara_Ghostly Trees_Full.jpg. If you store your image with this name, the process to upload images for a call for entry will be easier. Images in a jpg format are universally accepted format. You should always retain an image at the highest resolution possible, so you can prepare an image that meets the requirements. On a PC, if you right click on the image and select Properties and Detail, you will see the resolution of the image and the dimension of the image in pixels.   On a Mac, Open any image in Preview and press Command+I.

There will be more on image size in a future post.

Detailed image (Ex: Matthews_Barbara_Ghostly_Trees_Detail.jpg)
Photographer This field is the name of the photographer, if you, then your name.   Photographers are artists too and should receive credit for the images.
Status of the art Has the art sold, what price? What was your share and date sold?
Name, Address, and email of the buyer To put on email list for announcement of other shows.
Awards Received Title and amount of award.

Inventory or Art Template

 

This is a template you are welcome to use for your art (The light grey fields are not required for the SDA-WA Fiber Fusion show)

Field Information about art
Title of Piece
Date art finished
Width in inches (whole numbers)
Height in inches
Depth in inches
Materials and Techniques
Statement about the art (maximum 500 char)
Insurance value
Where art has shown
First venue where art was shown
Dates shown
Price at that venue
Second venue where art was shown
Dates shown
Price at that venue
Third venue where art was shown
Dates shown
Price at that venue
Names and file locations of Images of piece
Full image
Detailed image
Photographer
Has the art sold, what price? What was your share?
Name, Address, and email of the buyer
Awards Received

 

We hope you find this helpful!  We’d love to hear from you if you have any feedback or suggestions!!

Sincerely,

The SDA-WA Team